6 Marketing Metrics Your Boss Actually Cares About

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As marketers, we work tirelessly to move the needle on what often seems like a laundry list of metrics. We look at website visits, conversion rates, generated leads per channel, engagement on social media platforms, blog post shares, email click-through rates... and the list goes on and on. When the time comes to present the impact of your marketing efforts to your boss, you can’t present him or her with everything you measure.

When it comes to marketing metrics that matter to your execs, expect to report on data that deals with the total cost of marketing, salaries, overhead, revenue, and customer acquisitions. This guide will walk you through the six critical marketing metrics your boss actually wants to know.

Customer Acquisition Cost (CAC)

CAC illustrates how much your company is spending per new customer acquired.
You want a low average CAC. An increase in CAC means that you are spending comparatively more for each new customer, which can imply there’s a problem with your sales or marketing efficiency.

Marketing % of Customer Acquisitions Cost

The M%-CAC can show you how your marketing teams performance and spending
impact your overall Customer Acquisition cost.

Ratio of Customer Lifetime Value to CAC (LTV:CAC)

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The higher the LTV:CAC, the more ROI your sales and marketing team is delivering
to your bottom line. However, you don’t want this ratio to be too high, as you should always be investing in reaching new customers. Spending more on sales and marketing will reduce your LTV:CAC ratio, but could help speed up your total company growth.

Time to Payback CAC

In industries where your customers pay a monthly or annual fee, you normally want
your Payback Time to be under 12 months. The less time it takes to payback your CAC, the sooner you can start making money off of your new customers. Generally, most businesses aim to make each new customer profitable in less than a year.

Marketing Originated Customer %

This metric illustrates the impact that your marketing team’s lead generation efforts
have on acquiring new customers. This percentage is based on your sales and marketing relationship and structure, so your ideal ratio will vary depending on your business model. A company with an outside sales team and inside sales support may be looking at 20-40% Margin Originated Customer %, whereas a company with an inside sales team and lead focused marketing team might be at 40-80%. 

Marketing Influenced Customer %

This metric takes into account the impact marketing has on a lead during their entire buying lifecycle. It can indicate how effective marketing is at generating new leads, nurturing existing ones, and helping sales close the deal. It gives your CEO or CFO a big picture look into the overall impact that marketing has on the entire sales process.

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